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Cheryl Komline, RD, MS

Cheryl Komline, RD, MS
is the Public Health Nutritionist for the Bernards Township Health Department.
She  has more than 25 years experience in clinical dietetics
and nutrition education in hospital, community and college settings.


ckomline@bernards.org

direct number is 908-204-3069

Rebecca Zeltmann

Last updated Jul 21, 2010
Rebecca Zeltmann will complete her dietetic internship at the College of Saint Elizabeth in June 2010 and will sit for the Registered Dietitian exam later this summer. She has a prior degree from Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration where she trained in foodservice and food preparation. She is passionate about teaching nutrition through cooking and believes that healthy food can be not only easy to prepare, but also delicious.

Cucumber question

Posted by Carol Jones, Jul 19, 2010.
Cucumber question
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Posted by Carol Jones, Jul 19, 2010
(1) I used to avoid cucumbers because they made me burp. Some restaurants serve unpeeled cucumber in a salad. Could the peel be the cause of burping? Lately I've tried having peeled, sliced cucumber in a dressing of olive oil, cider vinegar and agave nectar with a dash of sea salt and dill and I haven't had the burping problem. Could the vinegar be the key?
(2) I notice that a lot of recipes for salads with cucumber say to peel them and remove the seeds. Is there any benefit to removing the seeds?
RE: Cucumber question
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Posted by Cheryl Komline, Jul 19, 2010
Carol,

Belching or burping is a process of the body expelling excess air or gas out of the stomach upwards and out through the mouth. It can be uncomfortable, annoying and embarrassing. It can be evidence of a medical condition or simply and intolerance to a food or eating habit, such as eating too fast or becoming too full. Here is a good online reference to provide you with a comprehensive overview:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/gas-and-gas-pains/DG00014

As far as cucumbers, one research study that was conducted at the Department of Horticultural Science at North Carolina State University suggested that the likeliness of a cucumber to cause burping is dependent upon the susceptibility of the individual and the cultivars or type of cucumber.

http://cuke.hort.ncsu.edu/cucurbit/wehner/articles/art090.pdf

 

There are cucumbers that are more easily tolerated. These are called ‘burpless’ cucumbers. In the Burpees seed catalog they are described as: Burpless' cucumbers, both American and Asian types, contain low or no cucurbitacin, the compound that causes bitterness and increases one's susceptibility to 'burping' after eating the fruits. Look for these cucumbers in the store. I like the type that are called English cucumbers. They are long and straight and are often wrapped in plastic. They may be a bit more costly. Removing the skin or seeds may also help.

 

By the way cucumbers are a good source of Vitamin C and have a fair amount of Vitamin A and  folate, a B vitamin. They are very high in the mineral molybdenum. They are also a good source of the minerals potassium, manganese, and magnesium as well as dietary fiber. Good luck and happy eating!

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